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In the late 80’s I worked as a real estate agent in Sydney at a place named Double Bay (sometimes referred to as Double Pay).

Altona2

My specialisation was residential mansions on the waterfront of Sydney harbour’s eastern suburbs. These homes were often palatial and many had their own jetties or pontoons where their owners could moor their luxury yachts. On the northern side of the wealthiest suburb Point Piper the spectacular views across the sparkling harbour took in the city skyline and the harbour bridge.

The company I had just begun to work for owned a 40 foot corporate motor-yacht which was berthed at Double Bay and used to entertain clients at weekends, but it was hardly ever used.

I thought that was a shame and suggested we use it to take prospective buyers out on the harbour and show them the waterfront properties we had for sale from the water; docking at their jetties and conducting inspections from the boat. The idea was agreed on by the company directors and we changed the name of the boat to ‘Waterfront’.

From then on I would take my buyers out myself and show them one or two properties. We always had a catering lady on board who provided a tasty array of tiny sandwiches, snacks and Moet Chandon champagne to our guests. These trips were always a huge success and resulted in many famous sales.

Grand Banks Yacht

A few months later (at great expense) we published a glossy coffee-table type book entitled ‘Waterfronts’ with stunning aerial images of every harbourside property in Sydney’s eastern suburbs taken from a helicopter by a professional photographer, and hand-delivered it for free to every one of them.

There was no advertising in it; only our company name. We didn’t even include a telephone number to call  – that was not the point.

The real mission was to get our book into every home in our target market and have the book sitting on their coffee table for many years into the future, and it worked because we became one of the best known and most successful agents in Australia.

The moral of this story is; invest to be DIFFERENT from your competition, be innovative and stand out from the crowd!